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Contents

Introduction

Hi there, in this video we're going to talk about what happens when you get given one mp3 file, that's this one here, Sound 4, but actually it's a bit weird. It's got my part of the interview on the left channel, and my interviewee, Tayla Coman on the right channel, they've been smooshed together. Happens a lot with podcasts. I'm going to show you how to split them up so you can use them separately. 

I won't make you sit through the podcast, because it's basically just there to help us make this file. You can listen to it on your own if you so wish, but let's show you how to separate them up. To separate these two out, let's drag the original onto my Timeline, just to see. One mp3, two different tracks being used. To separate them is have it selected, go up to 'Clip', go down to 'Audio Options', and go to 'Breakout to Mono'. It just separates this stereo that had two separate tracks, into two mono tracks, left and right. 

I'm going to name mine just because-- I'm going to click it, just because… Man, where am I going? Click it once, don't double click it. I'm going to call this one 'Podcast Dan', because that was my side. I think I was the left, and this is 'Podcast Tayla'. I'm going to delete that one, now I've got two separate tracks, that I can do two separate things with. 

Remember in the last video where we did the fancy-- was it this one, One Side Only, we went, right click, 'Modify', or 'Audio Channels', and we kind of separated them. We did this, this, this to mono, remember that? You could do the exact same thing here. You could get it down to one, by instead of smooshing them together, is separating them out and just deleting the one you don't need. You might decide that this side is gone. We end up in a similar position. 

Now why do we get these? Happens a lot for me when we're recording on either of these two things. Basically you can plug two microphones into one recorder. This recorder is clever enough to go, instead of that, separating, well, instead of having two separate files that you're going to line up later on, is it will actually just make one mp3 or wav file, or whatever its format is, and it will put one kind of source from the microphone, one interviewee on one side, and one on the other, and later on you can separate it. That's what we just did, otherwise you got to have two microphones, and yeah, no fun. 

I use this one as well, so that's kind of a recorder, this one here is, it will pull in-- that's what I use for my camera. I can pull in two different microphones. It puts one microphone on one channel and one on the other, and runs-- I run it straight out into my camera. So it actually matches up with my video straight away. Anyway, getting a bit nerdy. 

Oh, one last thing before we go, is we split stereo, this one here into two monos, you can do the same thing with, remember our Dolby 5.1, you can right click it and do the same thing. Don't right click it, go to 'Clip', go to 'Audio Options', and 'Breakout to Mono'. You'll see you get all the different options, six in total. Weird, anyway I'm going to undo that, and I'll see you in the next video.

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Video transcript

Hi there, in this video we're going to talk about what happens when you get given one mp3 file, that's this one here, Sound 4, but actually it's a bit weird. It's got my part of the interview on the left channel, and my interviewee, Tayla Coman on the right channel, they've been smooshed together. Happens a lot with podcasts. I'm going to show you how to split them up so you can use them separately. 

I won't make you sit through the podcast, because it's basically just there to help us make this file. You can listen to it on your own if you so wish, but let's show you how to separate them up. To separate these two out, let's drag the original onto my Timeline, just to see. One mp3, two different tracks being used. To separate them is have it selected, go up to 'Clip', go down to 'Audio Options', and go to 'Breakout to Mono'. It just separates this stereo that had two separate tracks, into two mono tracks, left and right. 

I'm going to name mine just because-- I'm going to click it, just because… Man, where am I going? Click it once, don't double click it. I'm going to call this one 'Podcast Dan', because that was my side. I think I was the left, and this is 'Podcast Tayla'. I'm going to delete that one, now I've got two separate tracks, that I can do two separate things with. 

Remember in the last video where we did the fancy-- was it this one, One Side Only, we went, right click, 'Modify', or 'Audio Channels', and we kind of separated them. We did this, this, this to mono, remember that? You could do the exact same thing here. You could get it down to one, by instead of smooshing them together, is separating them out and just deleting the one you don't need. You might decide that this side is gone. We end up in a similar position. 

Now why do we get these? Happens a lot for me when we're recording on either of these two things. Basically you can plug two microphones into one recorder. This recorder is clever enough to go, instead of that, separating, well, instead of having two separate files that you're going to line up later on, is it will actually just make one mp3 or wav file, or whatever its format is, and it will put one kind of source from the microphone, one interviewee on one side, and one on the other, and later on you can separate it. That's what we just did, otherwise you got to have two microphones, and yeah, no fun. 

I use this one as well, so that's kind of a recorder, this one here is, it will pull in-- that's what I use for my camera. I can pull in two different microphones. It puts one microphone on one channel and one on the other, and runs-- I run it straight out into my camera. So it actually matches up with my video straight away. Anyway, getting a bit nerdy. 

Oh, one last thing before we go, is we split stereo, this one here into two monos, you can do the same thing with, remember our Dolby 5.1, you can right click it and do the same thing. Don't right click it, go to 'Clip', go to 'Audio Options', and 'Breakout to Mono'. You'll see you get all the different options, six in total. Weird, anyway I'm going to undo that, and I'll see you in the next video.