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Hey there, in this video we're going to describe the difference between vibrancy, ooh, nice, and saturation, oh, not so nice, and I can feel a vignette in our future. Yes, I can. 

To get started, in your 'Footage' folder, let's make, we're going to use 'Color 1 PP Pre Launch'. So right click that and make a sequence from it. We'll just use this to do our practicing. With it selected, let's do a bit of basic editing quickly to get it up to speed. Just the practice, 'Dialogue', 'Auto Match'. Make sure the audio comes up, nice. Let's go to Central Graphics, no, let's go to Lumetri Color, which you can almost see there, and do your basic corrections. I'm just going to go to 'Auto' because I'm lazy. I should go through and start adjusting this a little bit more, because it's a little bit dark. Actually can't help myself, I'm going to speed this up. 

All right, I'm back, what do I feel? Yeah. Definitely better. So what we're looking for is, never using saturation, saturation, bad. I got sun burnt. So even if you just do a little bit I'm just getting a little bit sun burned. So what you'll find is-- turn it back to 100, and the one you're looking for is under Creative. I'm going to close down Basic Correction, and open up 'Creative'. Just don't use Saturation, this one here, use Vibrance. 

Vibrance is really good at protecting skin tones. It also does cool things where, watch this, Saturation, watch the screen here, it's quite rich in terms of color. Same with my skin, if I crank it right up, this gets quite overdone, my skin obviously gets overdone, just kind of, goes too far, it grabs every single color that exists, and lifts it up, whereas vibrance is different, what it does, you probably still don't want at 100%, but what it does is it tries to find colors that are pretty low. 

You'll notice that the colors in here don't change very much, whereas colors that are quite light, or don't have a lot of saturation in them get affected, but the ones that are already rich get left alone. Does that make sense? So it kind of lifts up the ones that are a bit weak, but leaves the strong ones, and it's just a-- just gives you a bit of effect in 99% of the cases. There are times, with saturation you just want to yank up, because it's-- generally it's maybe non live footage. Might be digitally created, maybe through some sort of 3D software or After Effects, saturation could be fine, but also vibrance, except as skin tones, you can see I can--

Let's turn Creative on and off. I've really brightened up, you can see the dulls in the blue, is a really good example; on/off. It's really brightened those up, but it hasn't overcooked the purples and pinks in here, and it's left my skin alone, which is useful. So that's the difference between vibrance and saturation. I've explained it a couple of times with saturation, let's all colors up equally, and vibrancy leaves the already saturated ones, and tries to lift up the little weak ones, to try and make them pop a little bit more. I should have said that at the beginning, there you go, I've said it like three or four times now, hopefully one of those stuck. 

Vibrance good, saturation bad. And one thing for old times sake, clip selected, and just one more vignette, I promise, just one more. And if you ain't here, I'd do this. I'll just do it here because you're watching, just a little one, just one more time. That's it, also any of you acknowledge that the quality of this one is pretty low. Mainly because I made it for Instagram, so I kept the quality quite small, so uploaded fast. So it's not the best example, but yeah, there you go. Goodbye me, have a shave. I'll see you in the next video.